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Requested Recipe:

SCUPPERNONG PYMENT


"I have enough scuppernong grapes and some wild
honey to make a batch. I would be very thankful to
you for a fitting recipe."
Horace Furlough, Arkansas



SCUPPERNONG GRAPES


The scuppernong grape makes a wonderful wine. Recipes for scuppernong wine can be found on this website in the section on Native North American Grapes and their Wines. But scuppernongs also makes a wonderful mead. True mead is made from honey and water, with acid, tannin and yeast nutrients added before a yeast is introduced. A mead to which grapes have been added prior to fermentation is called a pyment. The recipe below will make one gallon.


SCUPPERNONG PYMENT

Grapes should be ripe, clean and destemmed. If stems are left on grapes, reduce tannin by half. While removing any unsound grapes, put 5 pints water on to boil and stir in honey until dissolved. Skim any foamy residue from honey off top of water. Put grapes in nylon straining bag and tie closed. In primary, crush grapes well. Pour boiling water over grapes and stir in all remaining ingredients except yeast, which should be in starter (Vierka mead yeast should be started 3 days in advance in 1 cup warm water into which are dissolved 1/4 tsp yeast nutrient and 1 tsp honey). Cover primary and allow to cool to room temperature. Add yeast starter and recover primary. When fermentation becomes vigorous, squeeze bag twice daily for 7 days. Remove bag and press to extract all juice, which is added back to primary (discard pulp). Allow fermentation to subside before transferring to secondary. Top up if required and attach airlock. Rack every 30 days for three months, then every 60 days for six months, topping up and reattaching airlock each time. Starting with first racking, add crushed Campden tablet every other racking. Stabilize and sweeten if desired 2-3 weeks before bottling. Will improve with age until about fourth year. [Author's own recipe]

My thanks to Horace Furlough of Arkansas for this request.

This page was updated on October 10th, 2001

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