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Requested Recipe:

PINEAPPLE WINE


"Do you have a receipe for Pineapple Wine?"
Paul, location unknown




PINEAPPLES


The pineapple (Ananas comosus) is an American tropical plant. The flesh of a fresh pineapple is unbelievably sweet and the flavor intense, but both the sweetness and flavor fade rapidly after harvest. By the time the fruit reaches your local market, the intense flavor and sweetness made be decidely reduced. For that reason, pineapple wine made from canned pineapple or pineapple juice are, generally speaking, every bit as good as wine made from fresh pineapple fruit.

If you can find really fresh pineapple fruit, by all means try the first recipe below. If you have doubts as to the freshness, you might as well try one of the other recipes. Fresh pineapples are fragrant, a little sticky to the touch, and the tuft of leaves on top are a little loose. If the body of the fruit is soft, however, it is past ripeness and should not be purchased. Really fresh pineapples make the very best wine, but if the fruit are simply so-so, you might as well look at the other options and select the most economical.

If you can get a good bargain on crushed pineapple canned in its own juices, buy it and use the second recipe below. It makes a pretty good wine and involves a lot less work than using a so-so fresh pineapple.

Finally, if you can obtain sweetened pineapple juice cheaply, without preservatives or artifical flavor or sweetener, buy it instead. It is easily made into a very good white wine without any of the fuss fermenting on the pulp involves.


FRESH PINEAPPLE WINE

Bring water to boil and add sugar. Stir until sugar is completely dissolved. Meanwhile, remove the topknot (leaves) and skin of the pineapple, capturing any juice produced in the process. Cut the flesh away from the core and chop the flesh into small pieces. Again, collect all juice liberated by the cutting. Put in nylon straining bag and tie closed. Put bag in primary and crush with a piece of hardwood or a potato masher. Pour boiling water over fruit, cover, and set aside to cool. When at room temperature, stir in crushed Campden tablet, recover and set aside for 12 hours. Stir in pectic enzyme, tannin, acid blend, and yeast nutrient. Recover and set aside another 12 hours. Add activated yeast and ferment 7 days, stirring twice daily. Remove nylon straining bag and allow to drip drain without squeezing. Discard pulp and continue fermenting until specific gravity falls to 1.025. Rack into secondary and fit airlock. After two weeks, rack, top up and refit airlock. Repeat this procedure every 30 days until wine clears and no new sediments form over 30-day period. Stabilize and sweeten to taste. Wait 10 days and, if stable, rack into bottles. Age 6 months to a year before tasting. [Recipe adapted from Terry Garey's The Joy of Home Winemaking]


CANNED PINEAPPLE WINE

Drain juice from fruit and add juice to water. Stir sugar into water until dissolved. Pour pineapple into nylon straining bag and tie closed. Put bag in primary and add all ingredients except pectic enzyme and yeast. Stir well, cover primary, and set aside for 12 hours. Add pectic enzyme, recover and set aside another 12 hours. Add activated yeast and ferment 5 days, stirring daily. Remove nylon straining bag and allow to drip drain without squeezing. Discard pulp and continue fermenting until specific gravity falls to 1.025. Rack into secondary and fit airlock. Rack, top up and refit airlock every 60 days for 6 months. Stabilize and sweeten to taste if desired. Wait 10 days and, if stable, rack into bottles. May taste after 6 months. [Recipe adapted from Terry Garey's The Joy of Home Winemaking]


PINEAPPLE JUICE WINE

Dissolve sugar in water. Add remaining ingredients except yeast, stirring well. Cover primary and set aside 12 hours. Add activated yeast and ferment 7-10 days, stirring daily. When specific gravity falls to 1.010, rack into secondary and fit airlock. Rack, top up and refit airlock every 30 days until wine clears and no new sediments form over 30-day period. Stabilize and sweeten to taste if desired. Wait 10 days and, if stable, rack into bottles. May taste after 6 months. [Recipe adapted from Leo Zanelli's Home Winemaking from A to Z]


My thanks to Paul for requesting this recipe.


This page was updated on August 7th, 2000

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