horizontal divider


<

Requested Recipe:

PASSION FRUIT WINES


"As usual, if I want anything to do with home winemaking
I go to your page first and usually find what I want.
However this time I am chasing a recipe for Passion Fruit
Wine as I have come into a quantity of them and would like
to give them a try....I live in hope...."
Ron Senn




PASSION FRUIT


Passion fruit is a member of the Passiflora family. The name refers to the "Passion of Christ" rather than to other human emotive states. There are many varieties, but not all are edible. All passion fruit are filled with seeds surrounded by a juicy, acidic, aromatic pulp.

Passiflora edulis is the primary edible variety, known as the Purple Granadilla in Central America and Lilikoi in Hawaii. North America's native Passiflora incarnata, also known as Apricot Vine or Maypops, has smaller fruit that are less flavorful than P. edulis. Passiflora lutea and Passiflora pallens, both native to southern Florida and the Keys, are also edible but less flavorful than P. edulis. The acidity, sweetness and aroma vary greatly among the species. Here are two recipes. The first makes a fuller-bodied wine, but the second makes a more interesting one. Both recipes are for one gallon.


Passion Fruit Wine (1)

Clean fruit and discard any that are unsound or under-ripe. Chop fruit coarsely and place in nylon straining bag, saving any juice that emits during chopping. Tie bag and place with juice in primary. Crush fruit well with hands. Add sugar, crushed Campden, yeast energizer, and white grape juice. Stir well to dissolve sugar. Cover primary and set aside 12 hours. Add pectic enzyme, recover primary and set aside another 12 hours. Add activated yeast and recover primary. Squeeze bag and stir must daily until specific gravity drops between 1.010 and 1.015 (about 5-7 days of vigorous fermentation). Drip drain pulp (squeeze bag gently only), rack into secondary, top up, and fit airlock. Ferment to dryness, racking every 30 days until wine clears. Stabilize and sweeten if desired, although it is best as a dry wine. Wait 10 days and rack into bottles. Aging of this wine depends on its astringency. Taste after 6 months and age longer if not ready. May take a year. Served chilled. [Author's own recipe]


Passion Fruit Wine (2)

Clean fruit and discard any that are unsound or under-ripe. Chop fruit coarsely and place in nylon straining bag, saving any juice that emits during chopping. Tie bag and place with juice in primary. Crush fruit well with hands. Add sugar, crushed Campden, yeast energizer, and water. Stir well to dissolve sugar. Cover primary and set aside 12 hours. Add pectic enzyme, recover primary and set aside another 12 hours. Add activated yeast and recover primary. Squeeze bag and stir must daily until specific gravity drops between 1.010 and 1.015 (about 5 days of vigorous fermentation). Drip drain pulp (squeeze bag gently only), rack into secondary, top up, and fit airlock. Ferment to dryness, racking every 30 days until wine clears. Stabilize and sweeten if desired, although it is best as a dry wine. Wait 10 days and rack into bottles. Aging of this wine depends on its astringency. Taste after 6 months and age longer if not ready. May take 2 years, but will be worth it. Served chilled. [Author's own recipe]


My thanks to Ron Senn for this request.

This page was updated on January 31st, 2000

If our website has helped you in your wine or mead making endeavors
and you feel moved to contribute to help offset our expenses, you may...


Home Page Prelude My Approach Getting Started Glossary of Terms Search This Site
The Basic Steps Advanced Winemaking All About Yeast Using Your Hydrometer Winemaker's Library Winemaking Links
Winemaking Recipes Requested Recipes Winemaking in Texas Wines From Edible Plants Native North American Grapes Visitor-Submitted Recipes
Wine Labels Conversions and Equivalents Measuring Additives Winemaking Problems Jack's WineBlog The Author