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Requested Recipe:

Mead


"I have been looking for a recipe for mead (honey wine). Your
assistance would be greatly appreciated"
Kirk Williams




MEAD


Mead is basically honey fermented in water with some sort of flavoring added, although it can be made with maple syrup in lieu of honey. There are literally hundreds of variations, but one thing they all have in common is that mead requires at least one year aging in the bottle before it even begins to taste good. After two years, it will be great. After three years, it will be fantastic. I don't think any mead has ever survived four years. It simply gets consumed somewhere between "good" and "fantastic." Here are six recipes that will offer insight into experimenting to create your own recipes. You can use various flowers, berries, extracts, spices, fruit, etc., but remember that mead must be aged a year.

A Texas Pyment (1 Gallon)



Crush grapes, tie inside nylon straining bag and place in primary along with any juice. Bring one quart of water to a rolling boil, remove from heat and carefully add honey. Gently stir to dissolve honey and let sit about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, make a yeast starter solution and husband it until needed. Add 1-1/2 quarts cold water to honey-water and stir in one finely crushed and dissolved Campden tablet and yeast nutrient and carefully pour water over grapes. Cover primary, set aside 10-12 hours and then stir in starter solution. Recover primary and set aside. After 5 days, remove nylon straining bag and press grapes, returning juice to primary. When vigorous fermentation subsides, transfer to secondary and attach airlock. When fermentation concludes, rack, top up and test acidity. Bring up to 0.55-0.6. Refit airlock and set aside 2 months. Rack again, wait another 2 months and rack once more, adding another finely crushed and dissolved Campden tablet. Make sure liquid level in airlock is sufficient and set secondary aside for 3-4 months. Carefully check bottom for evidence of fine dusting of dead yeast. If present, carefully rack, wait 2 weeks and bottle; if dusting is not present, bottle. Mead improves incredibly with age, so wait at least a year -- two if you are strong-willed. [Author's own recipe]


Blackberry Mead (1 gallon)

Any black honey will work, but thistle honey is recommended. Mix honey into 3 qts water and bring to boil. Boil 20 minutes, skimming off any scum that forms. Pour into primary over thawed blackberries, pectic enzyme and yeast nutrient. When cooled to 70- 75 degrees, sprinkle wine yeast over surface. Cover and stir daily for 7 days. Strain through fine nylon bag, squeezing pulp well to extract all flavor. Transfer to secondary, fit airlock and ferment additional month. Rack, top up and refit airlock. Age until clear, then stabilize. Wait 10 days and rack into bottles. Age at least one year. [Adapted from a traditional recipe]


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Blanc du Bois Pyment (3 Gallons)



Disolve honey in 1 gallon of water. Crush and press grapes, add juice to honey-water. Add water to make 3 gallons. Test acidity and add acid blend to 0.6. Add three finely crushed and dissolved Campden tablets and yeast nutrient. Cover and set aside 10-12 hours while feeding a yeast starter solution. After 10-12 hours, stir yeast starter into must. When vigorous fermentation subsides, transfer to 3-gallon carboy and attach airlock. Ferment to dryness, wait additional month and rack. Set aside 3 additional months and rack into sanitized carboy containing 3 finely crushed Campden tablets and 1-1/2 tsp potassium sorbate. Wait 2-4 weeks and sweeten with 1 to 1/12 pounds of honey. Stir well and set aside at least 30 days. Rack if required and bottle. Age at least a year -- two will be better. [Author's own recipe]


Blueberry Mead (1 gallon)

Mix honey into 3 qts water and bring to boil. Boil 20 minutes, skimming off any scum that forms. Meanwhile, place thawed blueberries in nylon straining bag and mash in primary. Pour boiling water over blueberries, used teabag, pectic enzyme, and yeast nutrient. When cooled to 70-75 degrees, sprinkle wine yeast over surface. Cover and squeeze nylon bag daily for 7 days. Drain blueberries, squeezing well to extract flavor. Discard teabag. Transfer liquid to secondary, fit airlock and ferment additional 30 days. Rack, top up and refit airlock. Stabilize when clear, wait 10 days, and rack into bottles. Age 1-2 years. [Adapted from a traditional recipe]


Blueberry Melomel Recipe (2)



On the morning before, add the yeast to a starter solution. That night, crush the Campden tablet very fine and stir it and all other ingredients into the must except the yeast starter solution and cover the primary. The next morning, pitch the yeast starter solution and recover primary. Stir daily until s.g. drops to 1.010, then transfer to secondary and attach airlock. Ferment 30 days and rack, top up and reattach airlock. Wait 30-45 days and rack again, then repeat after additional 30-45 days. After third 30-45-day period, inspect bottom of secondary for sediment. It should be clean, in which case you can bottle the mead, but if a very light dusting is visible rack once again and bottle after a few days. Bottle age at least 3 months, but longer aging is encouraged. [Author's own recipe]


Chocolate Mead
makes 6 gallons



Use 1 pint of warm water containing a teaspoon of dissolved sugar and a pinch of yeast nutrient to make a yeast starter solution to get the yeast propagating. Pour the honey (unboiled) into the primary. Use some of the water to get all the remaining honey from the honey bottles and add this to the primary. Add 3 gallons of water and stir well to dissolve.

Put the teabags into 1 cup of hot water and set aside. Now prepare the cocoa powder.

Place a cup of water in a blender and turn it on to its lowest setting while slowly pouring 4 ounces of cocoa the powder into it. After a minute, add this to the primary and repeat until all 20 ounces of cocoa powder is dissolved and added.

Check the tea. When water is dark, press teabags and add the tannic water to the primary along with the acid blend, yeast nutrient and yeast energizer. Stir while adding the remaining water, bringing the total volume to 6 gallons. Check temperature to ensure it is no colder than 65 degrees F. and no warmer than 80. Starting s.g. should be around 1.130. Slowly and gently add the yeast starter solution to the surface of the must (pour the solution into a large spoon held horizontally on the surface of the must to avoid pouring deep). Do not stir.

Cover primary and move it to a warm place. After 24 hours stir shallowly. After another 24 hours stir deeply. Transfer to secondary when vigorous fermentation subsides. Top up with pure honey, stir well with a sanitized wooden dowel, then affix airlock. Keep a record of how much honey you use for topping up, but do not exceed 5-1/3 cups (4 pounds). After adding that much, start topping up with water. Rack 30 days later, again topping up with pure honey, and 3 months after that (same drill as before). After additional 3 months, rack if needed and stabilize with potassium sorbate and potassium metabisulfite. Set aside for 6 additional months.

The original recipe from Tennessee called for adding 3 lbs of sugar at one point. To keep it a pure mead, I have used honey as a topping up medium in lieu of adding sugar. Four pounds of honey approximates 3 pounds of sugar, so the results should be the same. If, during topping up operations, you do not use 5-1/3 cups (4 lbs) of honey, your mead will probably be okay anyway, but final sweetness may need adjusting. Incidentally, one cup of honey weighs 12 ounces (340 grams).

Remember, there is no reason whatsoever to taste this mead until it is 9 to 12 months old, and even then it may need more aging to yummy up. But I promise you, it will yummy up. When it does, bottle it and allow 3 additional months for bouquet to form. [Nedra's recipe]


Hazelnut Mead



Bring water to boil and add honey, stirring. When water returns to a boil, reduce heat to hold a simmer, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes. Spoon off any scum that rises to the surface. Set aside to cool. Meanwhile, make a yeast starter with a couple of tablespoons of the honey-water, a pinch of yeast nutrient and 1/2 cup of warm (not hot) water. When honey-water cools to 110 degrees F., transfer to primary and add all ingredients except yeast starter and hazelnuts. Stir to dissolve and cover with sanitized cloth for 6-8 hours. Add yeast starter and recover primary. On 8th day, put hazelnuts in secondary, stir the must to suspend any fallen yeast, and transfer must to secondary until surface is 4 inches below mouth. Attach airlock to secondary. Transfer remaining must to 375-mL bottle and attach airlock (in #3 bung). Ferment two months and check s.g. If below 1.020, strain off hazelnuts and combine musts. Allow sediments to settle and rack into sanitized secondary. Rack as required (I did it every two months) until mead clears, adding crushed and dissolved Campden tablet every other racking. Thereafter, rack every two months for six months. Sweeten with honey-syrup (2 parts honey dissolved in 1 part water) until s.g. is 1.006. Wait 30 days to ensure fermentation does not restart, add Campden if required, and bottle. Age in bottles for two years. [Author's own recipe]


Herbs de Provence Metheglin
Makes 1 Gallon



Tie herbs in piece of nylon with sanitized glass marble and toss into primary. Add honey to warm water and stir until dissolved. Add nutrient and acid blend and stir some more. Sprinkle grape tannin on bottom of primary and pour honey/water in primary. Cover primary and allow water to cool to room temperature. Add yeast in an activated starter solution and cover primary with sanitized cloth. Stir twice daily until specific gravity drops to 1.030. Remove bag of herbs and transfer to one-gallon secondary. Top up if needed and affix airlock. Wait until fermentation stops, rack, top up, and fit airlock. Repeat and two months. Mead should be clear, but if not wait another two months and rack again. Stabilize with potassium sorbate and finely crushed and dissolved Campden tablet. Wait 30 days and bottle. Age at least six months. Longer is probably better. Flavor is complex. [Author's own recipe]



Hibiscomel (Hibiscus Mead)



Boil the honey in half the water, stirring occasionally until the honey is dissolved. Reduce heat to simmer for 30 minutes, skimming all scum off top as it forms. Tie flowers in nylon straining bag and place in primary. Pour the hot honey-water over flowers and stir in citric acid and yeast nutrient. Cover primary and set aside until it assumes room temperature. Add activated yeast as a starter solution and recover the primary to keep dust and insects out. Stir daily and punch down nylon bag until vigorous fermentation subsides. Remove straining bag and transfer mead to secondary fermentation vessel. Attach airlock and top up with water when fermentation ceases. Retain in secondary for 60 days from transfer date. Rack to a sanitized secondary, top up and reattach airlock. Set aside undisturbed for 60 days and rack again. If brilliantly clear, wait 30 days to see if light dusting develops on bottom. If so, wait additional 30 days and rack, top up and reattach airlock for another 30 days. If not brilliantly clear, wait full 60 days and rack, top up and reattach airlock. Then follow previous instructions when mead is brilliantly clear. Sulfite with one finely crushed and dissolved Campden tablet, bottle and set aside to age one year minimum. [Recipe adapted by author from creation by Brian Ryan, Western Australian]

Brian made his mead with 3+ ounces of fresh hibiscus flowers. I do not know how it turned out flavor-wise, but I suspect his alcohol was around 8% because of the amount of honey used and the increased volume to an Imperial gallon. Different sources report different figures, but I have always gone along with the conventional wisdom that you use 1.25 pounds of honey as an equal to one pound of sugar. To produce a 12% alcohol dry mead, one would then use 2.5 pounds of honey per U.S. gallon or 3 pounds per Imperial gallon. Of course, mead is not wine and there is no requirement for either that it be 12% alcohol. I went ahead and used the 2 pounds of honey and produced a dry mead at about 9.75% alcohol. When the mead was finished and ready to bottle, I added a quarter-teaspoon of citric acid to it to give it just a little more perk.


Jack Keller's Metheglin



Boil water. Meanwhile, tie teabags together and drop in water. Tie spices in a closely woven jelly bag (or in 6-inch square of finely woven muslin) and add to water. When water boils, remove from heat and stir in honey (you can boil the honey in the water, skimming off the surface scum as it forms, but I did not do this). Transfer to primary, stir in yeast nutrients and energizer, cover, and set aside overnight to cool. Meanwhile, prepare a yeast starter solution (1 cup water, 1 tablespoon honey, pinch of yeast energizer, sachet of wine yeast). When must is cooled, remove teabags and spices and add yeast starter solution to must. Cover and stir daily for about 10 days. Skim off any scum that rises from the must and transfer to secondary. Do not top up yet, but do affix an airlock. Rack, add finely crushed and dissolved Campden tablets, top up and reattach airlock after 30 days. Repeat racking (without adding additional Campden) 2-3 more times at 30-day intervals until no new sediment is dropped. Bulk age 4-6 months, bottle, and age an additional 6 months. {Author's own recipe]


Lavender Mead (1 gallon)

Boil 1/2 gal water and add honey, stirring to mix. In primary, pour hot water over all dry ingredients except yeast. When water cools to lukewarm, add remaining water and sprinkle yeast on top. Cover with cloth and ferment 7 days. Strain out flowers and transfer liquid to secondary. Fit airlock. Ferment 60 days and rack. Refit airlock and allow to sit another 60 days. Rack into bottles and allow to age one year. [Adapted from a traditional recipe]


Maple Syrup Mead (6 gallons)

Hydrate the yeast in a separate container of lukewarm water into which you have dissolved a pinch of yeast nutrient and a teaspoon of syrup. Mix the maple syrup with two gallons hot water in a 7-1/2 gallon primary and stir well to dissolve the syrup. Then add three gallons minus two cups of cool water and stir some more to mix and oxygenate the water. Check the specific gravity to ensure it is at least 1.105 (15% potential alcohol). Add more syrup if the desired S.G. was not reached. Add the yeast and remaining yeast nutrient. Cover and ferment 7 days. Transfer to a 6-1/2 gallon glass carboy and fit an airlock; retain any extra in a wine bottle using a #3 bung and airlock (for topping off). Allow to ferment out (about 30 days) and then bulk age until it clears (60-90 days). Volume will decrease as the syrup is fermented. Rack into a 6-gallon carboy, top up, and reattach airlock. Wait 30 days and taste. If too dry, stabilize and add another cup of syrup, stir, and taste again. Wait 10 days. If no sediments form, rack into bottles. If sediments form, wait another 30 days and rack again. If sediment-free for 30 days, rack into bottles. Age 1-2 years. [Adapted from a traditional recipe]


Maraschino-Chocolate Sweet Mead



I began a yeast starter the night before, using one cup of lukewarm water (98 degrees F.) into which I added 1/2 teaspoon of sugar and a pinch of nutrient. I sprinkled the yeast onto the surface, covered the jar with a napkin and set it aside to culture.

Following the advice in Ken Schramm's The Compleat Meadmaker, I mixed the honey with a quart of water in a large pot and brought it to 140 degrees F. for about 25 minutes to kill any compromising organisms that might have come with it. I then set it aside to cool.

After about two hours, I opened the large jar of Mezzetta's maraschino cherries and strained out the packing juice (syrup, if you wish). I added the juice to the honey and chopped the cherries by hand. A blender would have been faster, but that would have required adding back some of the juice (or water) and I wanted the cherries dry and separate.

I measured the cocoa powder in dry ounces and added it to one pint of warm water in a blender. I blended it until it was thoroughly mixed, added the tannin and other dry ingredients (less the yeast) to ensure they were all well mixed, and then added this to the honey. After stirring to integrate, I poured this through a funnel into a gallon jug to measure the amount of liquid, topping up with cold water to bring the total to a gallon. I stirred it with a sanitized wooden dowel and then drew off a cup of the liquid into a hydrometer test jar. A thermometer told me the liquid was a 78 degrees F., 10 degrees warmer than my hydrometer is calibrated for. So I stood it in my refrigerator with the thermometer floating in it.

Meanwhile, I transferred the chopped cherries into a nylon straining bag and tied it off. I placed the bag in a 3-gallon glass primary (with glass lid) and poured the liquid must over the cherries. I then checked the liquid I had placed in the refrigerator. It was 65 degrees when I removed it, so I let it stand on the kitchen counter for 10 minutes and when it was at 68 degrees I removed the thermometer and inserted the hydrometer with a spin. The starting s.g. was too high to measure with this particular hydrometer, so I measured 100 mL of must and added to it 100 mL of water. In the test jar, the hydrometer floated at 1.075, making the effective starting s.g. 1.152. This was actually 10 points below what I expected.

Satisfied the must was where I wanted it to be, I placed a large spoon on the surface of the must and slowly dribbled the yeast starter solution, which was now 15 hours old and very cloudy, onto the spoon. By moving the spoon around the surface of the must, the starter overflows onto the surface and sort of stays there. Since yeast need oxygen for healthy propagation, this puts them where they need to be. Tomorrow, if the must is not cloudy from yeast integration, I will shallowly stir the must. Since the starter solution (after 15 hours) contains approximately 130+ times the number of viable yeast cells as it did when I initiated it, I am confident fermentation will be evident tomorrow morning and go well.

There is a reason I added the acid blend and tannin to the must. My wife cares less for mead than I do because, according to her, they lack a little "something" that wines have. That something, I long ago decided, was both sufficient acid and tannin. When I began adding these ingredients to my meads, she liked them. I may well decide, after this batch is finished, to add a bit more acid blend to it. I'll judge that by taste when the time comes (after aging).

My plans are to punch down the bag of chopped cherries several times a day, checking their condition after several days. When they start looking ravaged by the yeast, I'll remove the bag and gently squeeze it to extract what liquid I can. I will keep the must in primary until the fermentation seems to die down, regardless of s.g., and then transfer it to secondary and cap it with an airlock. I'll rack it at least twice, probably more.

I expect this mead to finish sweet (between 1.025 and 1.045, with alcohol at 14-15%), since I used more honey than required for a normal mead. However, if it goes drier than I want, I'll stabilize it, age it six months, and sweeten it to taste. I'll then age it at least another six months, as the folks in Tennessee warned me that their mead (and their wines) took nine months to a year to "get yummy." And they were that!

There is a line in the movie, High Road to China (1983, Tom Selleck, Bes Armstrong, Jack Weston, Wilford Brimley, Robert Morley -- one of my 50 favorite movies of all time), in which Selleck is being told by a Buddhist holy man named Zura (played by Robert Lee) about Armstrong's father's passage through the area some time earlier. When he is done, Selleck asks, "Is there anything else you can tell us?" The holy man relies, "The oxen are slow but the earth is patient." I love that line. When making mead, you must be like the earth. [Author's own recipe]


Red Raspberry Melomel



Bring one quart water to boil and slowly stir in honey. Add lemon juice and slowly stir periodically until water returns to boil. Adjust to low boil and hold about 40 minutes, stirring periodically and skimming off scum as it rises. Meanwhile, place defrosted raspberries in nylon bag, tie closed and mash with flat-bottomed wine bottle in bottom of primary. Separately, begin a yeast starter solution with mead or Champagne yeast. Pour honey water onto berries. Wait 15 minutes and add remaining water and yeast nutrient. Cover primary and wait until must is room temperature. Stir in yeast energizer and activated yeast starter solution. Stir twice daily for 4 days, remove nylon bag and discard pulp. Ferment two more days and transfer to secondary. Attach airlock and ferment to dryness. Rack into sanitized secondary in which a finely crushed Campden tablet and potassium sorbate have been dumped. Top up and reattach airlock. Set aside two months and rack again. Stir in 1/3 cup of honey until absolutely dissolved and bottle. Age at least one year. [Author's own recipe]


Rose Mead (1 gallon)

Boil 1/2 gal water and honey for 20 minutes, skimming scum off surface. In primary, pour boiling mixture over all dry ingredients except yeast. When water cools to lukewarm, add remaining water and sprinkle yeast on top. Cover with cloth and ferment 10 days. Strain out flowers and transfer liquid to secondary. Fit airlock. Ferment 60 days and rack. Refit airlock and allow to sit another 60 days. Rack into bottles and allow to age one year. [Adapted from a traditional recipe]


Vanilla Mead (5 gallons)

Hydrate the yeast in a cup of lukewarm water. In a separate container, dissolve the yeast nutrient in another cup of lukewarm water. Mix the honey in two gallons hot water in a primary and stir well to dissolve the honey. Then add three gallons minus two cups of cool water and stir some more to mix ingredients and oxygenate the water. Add the yeast and yeast nutrient. Cover and ferment 7 days. Transfer to a glass carboy and fit airlock. Allow to ferment out (30-45 days). Taste. If too dry, stabilize and add another cup of honey, stir, and taste again. Wait 10 days and rack and top up. Allow to bulk age 60 days and rack into bottles. Age 1-2 years (the improvement between one and two years will astound you). [Adapted from a traditional recipe]


Varietal Mead, Dry



Boil the honey in half the water, stirring occasionally until the honey is dissolved. Reduce heat to simmer for 30 minutes, skimming all scum off top as it forms. Stir in citric acid, yeast energizer and yeast nutrient. Cover primary and set aside until it assumes room temperature. Add activated yeast as a starter solution and recover the primary to keep dust and insects out. Stir daily until fermentation ends - about 2 weeks. Transfer mead to secondary and attach airlock. Retain in secondary for 60 days from transfer date. Rack to a sanitized secondary, top up and reattach airlock. Set aside undisturbed for 60 days and rack again. If brilliantly clear, wait 30 days to see if light dusting develops on bottom. If so, wait additional 30 days and rack, top up and reattach airlock for another 30 days. If not brilliantly clear, wait full 60 days and rack, top up and reattach airlock. Then follow previous instructions when mead is brilliantly clear. Sulfite with one finely crushed and dissolved Campden tablet, bottle and set aside to age one year minimum. [Author's own recipe]


Varietal Mead, Semi-Sweet



Method: Same as for Varietal Mead, Dry. [Author's own recipe]


Varietal Mead, Sweet



Method: Same as for Varietal Mead, Dry. [Author's own recipe]


Vitis Aestivalis Pyment (1 Gallon)



Crush grapes, tie inside nylon straining bag and place in primary along with any juice emitted. Bring one pint of water to a rolling boil, remove from heat and carefully add honey. Gently stir to dissolve honey, pour over grapes in secondary and add a quart of cool water. Wait about an hour to cool further and test acidity; add acid blend to 0.6. Add one finely crushed and dissolved Campden tablet and yeast nutrient. Cover and set aside 10-12 hours while feeding your yeast starter solution. Meanwhile, begin a yeast starter solution and maintain it until needed. After 10-12 hours, stir yeast starter into must. After five days, remove grapes and press, returning juice extracted to primary. When vigorous fermentation subsides, transfer to secondary and attach an airlock. Ferment to dryness, wait an additional month and rack. Set aside 2-3 additional months and rack into a sanitized secondary containing another finely crushed and dissolved Campden tablet. Set aside at least 30 days. Rack if required and bottle. Age at least a year -- two will be better but requires great will power. [Author's own recipe]


Wild Muscadine Pyment (1 Gallon)



Make a yeast starter solution and husband it until needed. Crush grapes, tie inside nylon straining bag and place in primary along with any juice emitted. Bring one pint of water to a rolling boil, remove from heat and carefully add honey. Gently stir to dissolve honey and let sit about an hour to cool. Stir in one finely crushed and dissolved Campden tablet and yeast nutrient and carefully pour the honey-water over the bag of grapes. Cover primary, set aside 10-12 hours and then stir in starter solution. Recover primary and set aside. After 5 days, remove nylon straining bag and press the grapes, returning their juice to primary. Do not add water at this time to make one gallon. When vigorous fermentation subsides, transfer to secondary and attach airlock. Wait about a week and then top up. When fermentation finishes, rack, top up and test acidity. It should not need much correcting, but bring up to 0.55-0.6 (if using Scuppernongs, bring to 0.6 to 0.65). Refit airlock and set aside 2 months. Rack again, wait another 2 months and rack once more, adding another finely crushed and dissolved Campden tablet. Check liquid level in airlock and set secondary aside for 3-4 months. Carefully check bottom for evidence of fine dusting of dead yeast. If present, rack very carefully, wait 2 weeks and bottle. If dusting is not evident, go ahead and bottle. Mead improves incredibly with age, so wait at least a year -- longer if you can stand it. [Author's own recipe]


Zingimel (Ginger Mead)



Heat 1 quart water to perhaps 120 degrees F. and stir in the honey. Cover and remove from heat. Meanwhile, brought a separate 2 cups water with the ginger root slices to a gentle boil. When ginger slices begin to turn translucent carefully strain water into honey-water, discarding the root or saving for a mild tea. In primary, combine two quarts cold water, orange juice, yeast nutrient and energizer, and combined honey- and ginger-waters. Bring volume up to one gallon, cover and allow to cool to about 80 degrees F. Pitch activated yeast and recover primary. After 2 days stir daily until s.g. drops to 1.010 (mine did this on day 9), then transfer to secondary and attach airlock. Ferment 30 days and rack, add a finely ground and dissolved Campden tablet, top up and reattach airlock. Wait 60 days and rack again, then repeat after additional 60 days. After third 60-day period, inspect bottom of secondary for sediment. It should be clean, in which case you can bottle the mead, but if a very light dusting is visible rack once again and bottle after a few days. Bottle age at least 3 months and serve chilled. [Author's own recipe]

For some reason I was distracted when I pitched the yeast and did not take a starting specific gravity reading so I didn't know how much alcohol this mead had. Because it fermented dry (0.998), I used a vinometer and measured about 10.5% alcohol. At bottling time, this mead tasted marvelous. An ounce or so I chilled tasted even better.


My thanks to Kirk Williams and others for the requests.


This page was posted on February 16th, 1999, last updated November 26th, 2009.

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