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ADVANCED WINEMAKING BASICS
Continued


BLENDING WINES

"Calculators to aid in blending wines...."




Blending to Adjust Alcohol

When:

The Pearson Square is a tool that has been used for ages to answer the problem stated above. The calculator below yields the same answers as the Pearson Square. Simply enter the desired alcohol by volume (abv) of the blend, the abv of the base wine, and the abv of the fortifier (either a high-alcohol wine or a spirit, such as brandy). Then click "Submit." The answers will be in "parts" -- that is, the number of units (ounces, pints, liters, etc.) to add of each component.

The calculators below are based on javascripts used courtesy of The Meadery and are used with permission.

Desired Base Fortifier Base Fortifier


Solving Adjusted Alcohol of a Blend

When:

Stated another way, if you have two similar wines of different percentages of alcohol by volume (abv) -- say 2 gallons of cherry wine with 11.6% alcohol by volume (abv) and 3 gallons of cherry wine with 15.3% abv -- and you decide to blend them together, what would the alcoholic content of the blend be? The calculator below will give you the answer. Simply enter the lower % abv of the base wine, the higher % abv of the fortifier wine, and the numberical units (bottles, liters, gallons, etc.) of both the base wine and fortifier as indicated. The only rule is that the numerical units of quantity must be of the same volumetric measure (bottles, liters, gallons, etc.).

Alcohol Quantity Adjusted
Base Fortifier Base Fortifier Alcohol



Blending to Adjust Acidity

When:

  • the desired acidity (TA) is known,
  • Wine1 has lower acidity (TA) than the desired blend,
  • Wine2 has higher acidity (TA) than the desired blend,
  • the acidity (TA) of Wine1 and Wine2 are known, and
  • you want to know how many parts of Wine1 and Wine2 to blend together to get the desired acidity....

The calculator below tells you how much of each wine to blend to get the desired acidity. Simply enter the desired acidity (TA) of the blend, the acidity (TA) of Wine1, and the acidity (TA) of Wine2. Then click "Submit." The answers will be in "parts" -- that is, the number of units (ounces, pints, liters, etc.) to add of each component.

Desired Wine1 Wine2 Wine1 Wine2


Solving Adjusted Acidity of a Blend

When:

  • Wine1 has lower acidity (TA) than the desired blend,
  • Wine2 has higher acidity (TA) than the desired blend,
  • the acidity (TA) of Wine1 and Wine2 are known,
  • the quantity of Wine1 and Wine2 are known, and
  • you want to know the acidity (TA) of the final blend....

If you have two similar wines of different acidity (TA), as determined by measurement (acid test kit) -- say 2 gallons of Concord wine with a TA of 6.9 grams per liter (0.69%) and 3 gallons of Concord wine with a TA of 5.7 g/L -- and you decide to blend them together, what would the acidity (TA) of the blend be? The calculator below will give you the answer. Simply enter the acidity (TA) of Wine1 and Wine2 and the numberical units (bottles, liters, gallons, etc.) of both Wine1 and Wine2 as indicated. The only rule is that the numerical units of quantity must be of the same volumetric measure (bottles, liters, gallons, etc.).

Acidity Quantity Adjusted
Wine1 Wine2 Wine1 Wine2 Acidity



Blending to Adjust pH

When:

  • the desired pH is known,
  • Wine1 has lower pH than the desired blend,
  • Wine2 has higher pH than the desired blend,
  • the acidity (TA) of Wine1 and Wine2 are known, and
  • you want to know how many parts of Wine1 and Wine2 to blend together to get the desired pH....

The calculator below tells you how much of each wine to blend together to get the desired pH. Simply enter the desired pH you want to achieve, the pH of Wine1, and the pH of Wine2. Then click "Submit." The answers will be in "parts" -- that is, the number of units (ounces, pints, liters, etc.) to add of each component.

Desired Wine1 Wine2 Wine1 Wine2


Solving pH of a Blend

When:

  • Wine1 has lower pH than the desired blend,
  • Wine2 has higher pH than the desired blend,
  • the pH of Wine1 and Wine2 are known,
  • the quantity of Wine1 and Wine2 are known, and
  • you want to know the pH of the final blend....

If you have two similar wines of different pH, as determined by measurement (pH meter) -- say 2 gallons of Bkackberry wine with a pH of 3.1 and 3 gallons of Blackberry wine with a pH 3.6 -- and you decide to blend them together, what would the pH of the blend be? The calculator below will give you the answer. Simply enter the pH of Wine1 and Wine2 and the numberical units (bottles, liters, gallons, etc.) of both Wine1 and Wine2 as indicated. The only rule is that the numerical units of quantity must be of the same volumetric measure (bottles, liters, gallons, etc.).

pH Quantity Adjusted
Wine1 Wine2 Wine1 Wine2 pH




Also see

Conversions and Equivalents

Measuring Additives in Winemaking


Last update was October 12th, 2005.




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